Teaching Children About Inclusion

One of the most important lessons you will ever teach your child is about inclusion. It’s crucial that your child learns about tolerance and diversity in the world. They need to understand that others may be different than them, but they are just as special.

If your child says they don’t want to invite a certain friend to their party because they may act weird, dig for the real concern. You can explain to your child that just because a person may act differently doesn’t mean they are “weird.” You can remind your child that they don’t need to focus on one person at the party. It’s important that they pay attention to everyone equally at the party. They should quickly learn that including everyone will make each person feel special.

Children should grow up to be inclusive from a young age. They shouldn’t have to learn this value later in life. They should learn that everyone is unique.

Always encourage your child to include other people with disabilities. Even if the child cannot play the same as your child, it’s important to engage with them. They can make up games or change their type of play to include everyone., to play.

Teach your child to always treat others the way they want to be treated. It’s a traditional saying, but it rings true just as much today as a thousand years ago. Tell them to try to step into the other person’s shoes. Treat that person with respect and dignity, the way they would want to be treated.

Never label a child that has special needs. Tell your child to never say “the kid that has hearing aids” or “the one that is in a wheelchair.” This only points out differences. It’s important to see past these disabilities to the person’s core. Even if they don’t notice the difference, it’s important they learn not to label them, even if it is on accident.

Tell your child how special they are as a person. They should understand that if a child with special needs is belittling them, they don’t get special treatment just because they have a disability. Everyone is on an equal playing field and should be treated special.

Originally published on Russ Ewell’s website.

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